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The Speed of Wind: A Play in One Act by Garrett Socol

The Speed of Wind: A Play in One Act by Garrett Socol

Drama, Vol. 4.4, Dec. 2010

Cast of Characters
JENNY DALE: Beautiful, elegant, bright, 32 years old
MICHAEL DALE: Bold, intelligent, handsome, 60 years old
LIAM CHEADLE: Athletic, muscular, charismatic, 30 years old

Scene

The living room of Jenny and Michael Dale, in a quiet, upscale community. It is spacious, beautifully decorated and architecturally stunning.

Though the décor is modern, there are several antiques around the room.

There are two hallways, one leading to the kitchen, the other leading to the bedrooms and the rest of the house.

Time

The present

ACT ONE
Scene 1

JENNY is curled up on the sofa, reading a book. MICHAEL sits next to her, gazing at her.

Occasionally, we hear the sound of howling wind from outside.

In a few moments, JENNY becomes aware of MICHAEL’S gaze but doesn’t lift her eyes from the pages of her book.

MICHAEL

They’ve discovered a new species of frog.

(JENNY looks up at MICHAEL strangely. Pause.)

JENNY

They?

MICHAEL

Conservationists.

JENNY

Oh.

MICHAEL

It’s two-tone, with fluorescent lavender hoops.

JENNY

And what’s the other tone?

MICHAEL

A deeper purple, sort of violet, or aubergine. Maybe indigo.

JENNY

I like aubergine.

MICHAEL

The vegetable or the color?

JENNY

We’re talking about the color, aren’t we? You know I like the vegetable.

MICHAEL

Yes I do know that, unfortunately.

JENNY

Didn’t you enjoy dinner?

MICHAEL

Yes, the grilled asparagus was delicious, and the aubergine.

(pause)

I used to love a good steak, remember?

JENNY

Vividly.

MICHAEL

Steak and eggs, rib eye steak—steak, Diane. But it was good of you to insist I stop eating meat…

JENNY

Thank you.

MICHAEL

…despite the craving I continue to have for it.

JENNY

We all have cravings.

MICHAEL

What is it you crave?

JENNY

Quiet.

MICHAEL

Once in a while I do think about sinking my teeth into a juicy sirloin, or beef ribs smoked over hickory, or a gargantuan porterhouse, medium rare, smothered with onions and steak sauce. Instead I try to find the beauty in broccoli. I locate my inner vegan.

(pause)

It’s in South America, by the way.

JENNY

What is?

MICHAEL

The new species of frog.

JENNY

I’m glad.

MICHAEL

You never crave it?

JENNY

Meat?

MICHAEL

Yes.

JENNY

No.

MICHAEL

Not even at a summer barbecue?

JENNY

It isn’t a seasonal thing.

(MICHAEL gets up, goes to the window.)

MICHAEL

I thought I heard a car.

JENNY

I didn’t hear a car.

(pause)

MICHAEL

Have you given more thought to…?

JENNY

We’ve had this conversation.

MICHAEL

It’s time to have it again.

JENNY

We had it six or seven days ago.

MICHAEL

Nine or ten, Jenny. Maybe even eleven.

JENNY

Can I get you a dish of mocha mousse, Michael?

MICHAEL

I won’t be here forever.

JENNY

I feel like having dessert.

MICHAEL

You should have a child.

JENNY

I have a stepchild.

MICHAEL

He’s a year older than you.

JENNY

I feel the need for something sweet.

MICHAEL

Nothing sweeter than an infant in your arms.

JENNY

Something with granulated sugar and egg whites.

MICHAEL

You haven’t digested your vegetables.

JENNY

Of course I have.

MICHAEL

Wait ten minutes, please.

JENNY

Why? I’m in the mood for mocha mousse now. Are you sure I can’t bring you a dish?

MICHAEL

I’ll have mine in ten minutes.

JENNY

All right.

(JENNY walks out. MICHAEL dashes to the window, peers out expectantly. In a few moments, JENNY returns with a dish of mocha mousse. She sits, slowly eats.)

MICHAEL

The wind was ferocious earlier.

JENNY

Yes I know.

MICHAEL

Would it disturb you if—

JENNY

Of course not.

(MICHAEL goes to the CD player, presses a button. We hear Billie Holiday singing “I’ll Be Seeing You.” MICHAEL sits, closes his eyes.

In a few moments, he gets up, turns the music off, goes to the window.)

MICHAEL

I stopped by the office today. Peter sends his regards.

JENNY

How old is the baby now? Two? Three?

MICHAEL

Four, almost five.

JENNY

My goodness. What’s her name? Brenda?

MICHAEL

Glenda. Another one’s on the way.

JENNY

Boy? Girl?

MICHAEL

Yes. One of the two. Peter hired a new architect. Solid credentials. I took him to lunch.

JENNY

The new architect?

MICHAEL

Yes.

JENNY

Why?

MICHAEL

We were hungry.

JENNY

That’s so unlike you.

MICHAEL

I’ve been known to get hungry.

JENNY

You don’t take perfect strangers to lunch.

MICHAEL

He’s an employee at a company that bears my name. Not exactly a stranger.

JENNY

Where did you go?

MICHAEL

Old Roma. I had pasta. He had steak.

JENNY

Steak?

MICHAEL

Yes. No steak for me, though! No no no. I hope you don’t mind, but I invited him here.

JENNY

The carnivorous architect?

MICHAEL

With solid credentials.

JENNY

Why?

MICHAEL

I thought you should meet him.

JENNY

When?

MICHAEL

Any time now.

JENNY

Tonight?

MICHAEL

That’s the plan. He’s having dinner with a friend and I told him to save room for dessert. That’s why I asked you to wait before having your mousse.

JENNY

No, you told me to wait for digestive purposes.

MICHAEL

In any case, it would’ve been pleasant to enjoy our mousse as a threesome. You’ll like him, Jenny. He’s a good man.

JENNY

He eats steak.

MICHAEL

You never used to choose your friends by their diet.

JENNY

I was looking forward to a quiet evening, just you and me.

MICHAEL

I’m sorry. I should have asked.

JENNY

That would’ve been considerate. I’m not feeling very social, Michael.

MICHAEL

You don’t have to be your usual captivating self.

JENNY

I just heard a car.

MICHAEL

I didn’t hear anything.

JENNY

I distinctly heard the sound of an automobile.

MICHAEL

Maybe it was the wind.

JENNY

I would’ve suggested another night. Maybe even tomorrow.

MICHAEL

Tomorrow would’ve been fine, but as you know, he’s on his way over here tonight.

JENNY

You’ve really rattled me.

(Loud banging on the front door.)

I cannot believe our evening is being disrupted by a beef-eating intruder.

(MICHAEL rushes over, opens the door. LIAM CHEADLE, in T-shirt and gym shorts, stands there.)

MICHAEL

Liam, come in!

LIAM

Hello, Michael!

MICHAEL

Liam, this is my wife, Jenny. Jenny, Liam Cheadle.

JENNY

Hello.

LIAM

Pleasure to meet you, Jenny. Did you see the wind out there? It’s fierce. But it’s seventy-five degrees, so the air is warm. A strange, atmospheric night.

MICHAEL

Isn’t it!

LIAM

Please excuse my casual attire. You see, I was scheduled to have dinner with my friend Max at Old Roma, where Michael and I had lunch today. The second Max walked in the door, he noticed a raven-haired beauty sitting at the bar, and became obsessed with her. A good friend wouldn’t stand in the way, you know? So he bought her a drink while I sat at the other end of the bar. Twenty minutes and two black Russians later, Max decided to take the table I’d reserved for us and dine with the raven-haired woman instead of me. Again, a good friend wouldn’t stand in the way. Unfortunately there were no other tables available, so I decided to drive to a steak house about a mile down the road. I got to my car and discovered the left rear tire flat as a blueberry pancake. I had a flat about a month ago and used my spare at the time, so I didn’t have another. “To hell with it,” I thought, deciding to deal with the situation in the morning. But how would I get here? I knew your house wasn’t far, maybe a mile or two, and I hadn’t exercised in a few days, so I figured a jog would do me good. There was a nice breeze, perfect weather for a run. I changed into my gym clothes which were luckily in the trunk, and I carried my khaki pants and forest-green Ralph Lauren shirt on my arm so I’d look somewhat presentable when I got here. And off I went! But about eight blocks later, that breeze had grown into a veritable windstorm. Hanging traffic lights were blowing back and forth like wind chimes. Skinny people were throwing their arms around thick tree trunks so that the powerful gusts wouldn’t sweep them off the ground. At one point, the shirt and pants I was carrying flew into the air, landing at the top of a very tall tree. I started running as fast as I could, against the wind, I might add, and here I am: sweaty, disheveled, windblown, and about as embarrassed as someone can possibly be meeting a new friend for the first time. I humbly apologize.

JENNY

You actually considered having a steak for dinner after you’d eaten a steak for lunch?

LIAM

I beg your pardon?

JENNY

Before you noticed the flat tire, your plan was to drive to a steak house and order…a steak?

LIAM

Medium rare.

JENNY

After you’d eaten a steak for lunch.

LIAM

Correct.

JENNY

Are you aware that red meat takes days, sometimes weeks to digest?

LIAM

I thought it took a couple of hours.

MICHAEL

We can’t offer you steak, Liam, but I can prepare a plate of vegetables and a dish of delectable mocha mousse. Jenny made it herself.

LIAM

I’ll pass on the vegetables, but Jenny’s mousse sounds perfect. I’d love a dish.

MICHAEL

Excellent.

LIAM

Would it be all right if I rinse off in your shower?

MICHAEL

Our shower is your shower. I’ll get you something to change into. We’re about the same size, wouldn’t you say?

LIAM

Just about.

MICHAEL

Follow me, young man.

(MICHAEL leads LIAM down the hallway. JENNY watches with suspicion. She goes to the bar, pours herself a glass of red wine. Then she sits, continues to read.

In a few moments, MICHAEL returns.)

MICHAEL

I told you you’d like him.

JENNY

What makes you think I like him?

MICHAEL

Because he’s polite, down-to-earth, and he happens to be a brilliant architect.

JENNY

With solid credentials, I know. He’ll leave right after dessert?

MICHAEL

I don’t have the entire evening mapped out, Jenny, but I assume he’ll go home sometime after the mousse. I’ll have to drive him, of course. I’ll make tea. Mocha mousse goes well with tea, don‘t you think?

(MICHAEL doesn’t wait for a response. He darts out to the kitchen. In a few moments, MICHAEL returns.)

MICHAEL

Water is in the pot. What kind of tea do you think he likes?

JENNY

I don’t know our intruder well enough to provide a qualified response.

MICHAEL

I like wild orange spice, and an intruder is someone who enters uninvited. Liam is not an intruder.

JENNY

I prefer cranberry.

MICHAEL

After what he’s been through tonight, he might be in the mood for a cup of calming chamomile. Or a glass of brandy… I should get those clothes.

JENNY

Why don’t you.

(MICHAEL walks out. JENNY picks up her book, continues to read.

In a few moments, LIAM enters, hair wet, a thick Pima cobalt-blue cotton towel around his waist, revealing a perfectly sculpted chest.)

LIAM

Astonishing water pressure.

JENNY

(frazzled by his bare torso)

We’re happy with it.

LIAM

I feel so much better. I love showers, baths. Do you enjoy taking baths?

JENNY

Occasionally I like to soak in a hot tub, yes.

LIAM

I could sit in one for hours, even though my fingers get wrinkly. Do you have any idea what causes that?

JENNY

The water.

LIAM

(walks closer to her)

Well yes, but…why?

JENNY

I don’t really know. Must you stand so close?

LIAM

Of course not.

(LIAM moves back a few feet.)

JENNY

Could you please stand in a more casual, disinterested manner?

LIAM

Certainly.

(pause)

When you bathe, I imagine you in a warm tub with floral scented bubbles. Am I right?

JENNY

Please don’t imagine me in a tub.

LIAM

I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to offend… Michael tells me you run an antique shop.

JENNY

Yes. I’ve always had an appreciation for older objects. Anything created within the last thirty years holds no interest for me. How old are you, Liam?

LIAM

I’ll be thirty next month.

(pause)

What did you have for dinner, Jenny?

JENNY
Vegetables.

LIAM

Spinach? Fennel?

JENNY

Asparagus. Aubergine, or eggplant. With warm French bread and a lovely Bordeaux.

LIAM

I don’t like many vegetables.

JENNY

You’re a carnivore. You prefer eating cattle that have been shot in the head with a metal bolt before bleeding to death, and cows that have been dismembered alive, and hogs that were submerged into boiling water, squealing, in order to loosen their hide.

(pause)

LIAM

I do like yams… Are yams and sweet potatoes the same ?

JENNY

No. Yams have thick skin while the skin of the sweet potato is thinner. Sweet potatoes come in two varieties: dark-skinned, and tan-skinned with the sweet flesh I sometimes crave.

LIAM

So you crave tan skin and sweet flesh.

JENNY

On rare occasions.

LIAM

Do you vary the menu?

JENNY

Of course. Last night we started with a titanic salad.

LIAM

Titanic salad.

JENNY

Then we had poached Atlantic salmon.

LIAM

Atlantic salmon.

JENNY

Yes.

LIAM

What kind of lettuce was in the salad?

JENNY

Iceberg.

(pause)

JENNY

I understand your credentials are solid.

LIAM

Rock solid.

(sound of water boiling in teapot)

Listen to that wind.

JENNY

That’s the water for your tea. Is lively lemon all right?

LIAM

I’d prefer wild orange spice, if you have it.

JENNY

I’ll check.

(JENNY walks out. LIAM looks at the antiques in the room. Then he notices the book Jenny was reading. He picks it up, then quickly places it down.

In a few moments, JENNY returns with the tea, hands LIAM the cup and saucer.)

LIAM

Thank you.

JENNY

You’ll have to settle for lively lemon, I’m afraid.

LIAM

Lively lemon it is.

JENNY

I wonder where Michael is with your clothes.

LIAM

Probably trying to choose the ideal outfit.

(sips tea)

I love wild orange spice.

JENNY

That’s lively lemon.

LIAM

I know, but I love wild orange spice. Are you sure you don’t have any?

JENNY

Are you accusing me of lying?

LIAM

Of course not. But I have an acute sense of smell and I distinctly detect the scent of

wild orange spice in the air.

JENNY

Michael had a cup this morning. Its aroma lingers.

(MICHAEL enters, carrying a pair of khaki pants and a forest-green shirt.)

MICHAEL

(hands shirt and pants to him)

My clothing is your clothing.

LIAM

Thank you very much. I think I’ve stood around in this towel long enough.

MICHAEL

I had no idea you were so physically fit, like a sculpture.

LIAM

I play a lot of tennis and pump a little iron.

MICHAEL

Wouldn’t you say Liam is in fantastic shape, Jenny?

JENNY

I couldn’t say, really.

MICHAEL

All it takes is one look to see he’s in mint condition. I’ll bet you have to chase women off with a stick. Some men, too.

LIAM

Well, thank you.

MICHAEL

You’ve got sparkling blue eyes, a seductive smile, and the body of an underwear model. You have a lot going for you, young man.

LIAM

Well, so do you, Michael.

MICHAEL

Diplomatic, too. Quite the charmer, isn’t he!

JENNY

Quite.

MICHAEL

I can’t tell you how happy I am that you’re here.

LIAM

You make me feel very welcome, Michael. And Jenny…I look forward to licking up every morsel of your mousse. If you’ll excuse me, I’ll change into these clothes.

(LIAM heads down the hallway. Before he’s gone, the towel falls from his body. For a second, he is completely naked as he walks off.

JENNY looks at MICHAEL in stunned silence.)

JENNY

My God.

MICHAEL

I know for a fact you’ve seen the male body.

JENNY

You don’t find his behavior a little peculiar?

MICHAEL

He’s young. Free-spirited.

JENNY

I’m only two years older than him.

MICHAEL

Chronologically. In every other respect, you’re decades older.

JENNY

Why are you so ecstatic that he’s here?

MICHAEL

I think he’s going to become a great friend. I genuinely like him. In fact, if I were a woman, I think I’d be attracted to him.

JENNY

That’s an odd thing to say.

MICHAEL

Is it?

JENNY

Slightly.

MICHAEL

You find it strange for me to say that if I were a woman I’d want him to fuck me?

JENNY

Michael!

MICHAEL

Just asking a question.

JENNY

I can’t believe what I’m hearing. Why are you saying this?

MICHAEL

Because you’re my wife; I can ask you anything and tell you anything. Ah, you brought his tea.

JENNY

Yes.

MICHAEL

Where’s the mocha mousse?

JENNY

The mousse. I forgot the mousse.

MICHAEL

Forgot it? The whole point of the tea was to have it with the mousse!

JENNY

So bring it out now.

MICHAEL

You never forget things like that! Why are you deliberately treating him with disrespect? It’s as if you’re going out of your way to be rude to him.

JENNY

Perhaps because I wasn’t prepared for his arrival!

MICHAEL

Life has a tendency to surprise us.

JENNY

I don’t like surprises in my own home.

MICHAEL

Liam is a man of substance and breeding, talent and creativity, a man I would very much like to make love to.

JENNY

If you were a woman.

MICHAEL

If I were a woman. Please start treating him with a little courtesy.

(MICHAEL walks off. JENNY tries to assimilate all that’s happening.

In a few moments, MICHAEL returns with a dish of mousse, places it on the table.)

MICHAEL

Not back yet?

JENNY

Do you see him anywhere?

MICHAEL

I wonder what’s taking so long. Should I check on him?

JENNY

I think the man knows how to dress. He’s been doing it for nearly thirty years.

(LIAM enters, wearing the khaki trousers and forest-green shirt.)

LIAM

Your clothes fit perfectly, Michael.

MICHAEL

I’m so glad. They look better on you than they do on me. Your mousse, Liam! Your mocha mousse is ready to be devoured!

LIAM

Thank you.

MICHAEL

And you have your tea.

LIAM

Yes. Lively lemon.

MICHAEL

I personally prefer wild orange spice.

LIAM

So do I, but Jenny tells me you’ve run out.

MICHAEL

I could’ve sworn there’s a box. I’ll have a look.

(MICHAEL walks out. LIAM tastes the mousse.)

LIAM

This is sinful.

JENNY

Is it?

LIAM

Absolutely. You made it from scratch?

JENNY

I did. Why are you here, Liam?

LIAM

Michael invited me.

JENNY

What do you want?

LIAM

Want? I’m not sure I follow.

JENNY

Never mind.

(MICHAEL returns with a cup of tea.)

MICHAEL

A cup of wild orange spice tea, Liam. There was half a box.

LIAM

Wonderful. Thank you.

JENNY

I must’ve missed it.

MICHAEL

Yes. You must’ve.

(to LIAM)

Do you think she’s as beautiful as I told you she was?

LIAM

Your words didn’t do her justice.

MICHAEL

A pity she doesn’t want children, don’t you think?

JENNY

Michael! This is not the time or place.

LIAM

I understand your reluctance to talk about such a personal matter in front of a virtual stranger.

JENNY

Thank you, Liam.

(pause)

Why is it assumed every woman should want to give birth, and if she doesn’t she’s a freak of nature? I have nothing against women with children; I just don’t possess that maternal gene. Never did I aspire to be the perfect wife with two perfect little ones, worrying about soccer games and ballet classes, not to mention doll houses and day care. I happen to love children, as long as they’re not mine… I’ve been called selfish and cold. Well, I think some women who have children are the selfish ones, wanting miniature versions of themselves running around looking cute. I’m perfectly content with my work, my home, my activities, and my husband. It’s as simple as that.

LIAM

I admire you for knowing what you want.

MICHAEL

You might change your mind later, years from now, when it will be too late.

JENNY

How often do you see your child, Michael? Twice a year?

MICHAEL

At least I know he’s there.

JENNY

I don’t need to know someone’s there when I’m here.

MICHAEL

Jenny, why don’t you show Liam your tenderloin?

JENNY

What?

MICHAEL

Why don’t you take Liam to the backyard and show him your rhododendron? Jenny has the most extraordinary garden, a Monet painting come to life: blue delphiniums, Siberian irises. Tell him what else.

JENNY

Purple dahlias, orange zinnias, pink Peruvian lilies.

MICHAEL

And her rump roasts are in full bloom.

JENNY

What did you say?

MICHAEL

Didn’t you tell me your red roses are in full bloom?

JENNY

Oh. Yes. I did.

LIAM

Jenny, is there a secret to growing roses?

JENNY

Well…they don’t like overhead irrigation.

LIAM

(softly) Ah. In other words, they prefer to become moist down below? And the moisture rises through their stem?

JENNY
Precisely.

LIAM

I have so much admiration for someone who can create something out of nothing, in this case, the soil of the earth.

MICHAEL

It’s almost like having a child, isn’t it? Planting a seed, watching something magically grow in the earth’s uterus.

LIAM

Immaculate conception.

MICHAEL

There are dozens of bulbs out there. Would you be interested in taking a peek at Jenny’s bulbs?

LIAM

I seriously can’t think of anything I’d rather do.

JENNY

It’s dark now—impossible to appreciate a garden in the dark.

MICHAEL

Of course. You’ll have to come back another time, before dusk. Better yet—why don’t you stay the night? That way Jenny can show you her garden first thing in the morning.

LIAM

That’s a considerate invitation, but I don’t want to impose.

MICHAEL

No imposition at all! Don’t you agree, Jenny, that a garden should be seen first thing

in the morning?

JENNY

(repressing anger)

I don’t know what to say, Michael.

MICHAEL

First thing in the morning, the sun will be shining, the air will be crisp and clear,

a perfect time to examine Jenny’s blooms.

(The wind suddenly howls.)

LIAM

There’s the wind again.

JENNY

God, it’s wicked.

LIAM

It’s intense.

MICHAEL

Gale force winds are controlled by fundamental laws of nature, laws that are more powerful than any of us.

LIAM

Will it destroy the garden?

MICHAEL

Jenny’s garden is sturdy. The stems of her chrysanthemums are like steel. The petals

of her lilies are extremely resilient. The red roses may be her pride and joy, but personally I prefer her clematis. She’s got an amazing clematis, not to mention a dazzling snapdragon with its lipped tubular flowers that open when squeezed.

Liam, you must squeeze the lips of Jenny’s snapdragon.

LIAM

Consider it a plan.

(The wind howls again, intensely.)

JENNY

Wouldn’t you be more comfortable sleeping in your own bed, Liam? I’m always more comfortable in my own bed. Michael and I would be happy to drive you home.

LIAM

I do like sleeping in my own bed, but tonight I’d much rather sleep in yours.

I mean here.

JENNY

Would you be kind enough to make yourself comfortable in the guest room

for a few minutes?

LIAM

Of course.

(LIAM smiles politely, walks out.)

JENNY

Michael, could you please tell me what in God‘s name is going on?

MICHAEL

Liam is spending the night.

JENNY

You promised me he’d leave after dessert.

MICHAEL

I had no idea the storm would become so riled up, so overwhelming.

JENNY

I don’t want him here.

MICHAEL

You’ll get used to him.

JENNY

I don’t want to get used to him!

MICHAEL

The reality of life, its progression, necessitates changes, some small, some large, subtle shifts in order to adapt to nature’s realignment.

JENNY

You can’t do this!

MICHAEL

I’m sorry, Jenny.

(The sound of the wind is terrifying.)

JENNY

Please make it stop!

MICHAEL

I don’t think I can. It’s too intense, coming at us too quickly.

(slowly)

Sometimes you just know. Like when I first saw you, coming into my life like a blaze.

A kind of insanity takes over. Everything else slips away, nothing matters except your new center, your new reason for existing.

(pause)

That’s how I felt with Liam. But I felt it for me and for you. It was me and you having lunch with him today, me and you feeling this magnetic connection. He just belongs here. He belongs to us and we belong to him. In time you’ll understand. You’ll see him for the remarkable man he is.

(pause)

I have fewer days left than you do, Jenny. And Liam guarantees a solid future for you.

I want that more than anything. I had a long, fulfilling past, and you deserve a long, fulfilling future . You might even consider having a baby. I know that seems remote right now, but in a few years, you just might change your mind .

(pause)

Liam will be there to watch you turn forty, then fifty, and sixty. What an elegant sixty-year-old you’ll be. You’ll laugh with each other, cry, argue, you’ll force him to eat spinach when he really wants steak. And together, you’ll watch the world change. Comforting, to have someone with whom to watch the world change.

JENNY

But you’re the only…

MICHAEL

No. Don’t spend time looking back. It’s what’s ahead that matters. You can’t touch memories, you can’t wrap your arms around them. Don’t even try.

(pause)

May I invite him back? I’d like to bring Liam back in, but I don’t want to do that without your consent. Please tell me if I have your consent.

(pause)

Do I have your consent?

JENNY

(takes her time)

No…Yes.

(MICHAEL motions for LIAM to return LIAM enters, slowly.)

MICHAEL

Would you mind if I…?

JENNY

Yes…No.

(MICHAEL goes to the CD player, presses a button. Billie Holiday sings “I’ll Be Seeing You.”)

Billie Holiday:

I’ll be seeing you in every lovely summer’s day
In everything that’s bright and gay
I’ll always think of you that way
I’ll find you in the morning sun
And when the night is new
I’ll be looking at the moon
But I’ll be seeing you.

THE LIGHTS FADE TO BLACK

END OF PLAY

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